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Alzheimer’s Disease – The Stages of Onset

Alzheimer’s disease is a medical issue that affects the mental faculties of individuals over time. The disease has been shown to progress in stages, which can be helpful in identifying for patients and families where things stand.

The first stage of Alzheimer’s diseaseĀ E-Radio.ca is a simple one to define. It is the normal condition of the individual. There is not dementia, no loss of focus and one can function entirely on one’s own without assistance.

The second stage of Alzheimer’s disease is a very mild one. It is essentially a condition where forgetfulness becomes an issue. Forgetting names and where one has placed things are common problems. Of course, this tends to happen naturally as you age, so having either or both of these problems does not necessarily mean you have Alzheimer’s disease.

Stage three of Alzheimer’s disease is where the first clear cut symptoms appear. The patient will show a loss of association with things he or she is readily familiar with such as forgetting the name of a family member. The individual often realizes as much and denial, frustration and anger can accompany the condition.

With state four of Alzheimer’s disease, the individual begins to lose the cognitive ability to handle elements of their life. Financial issues can often arise due to poor choices and inability to work through situations. The individual will also forget elements of their personal history.

Stage five is classified as early dementia. The individual is no longer able to function on a daily basis without some assistance. Disorientation to current events, time, and significant personal historical events such as what college the person graduated will be revealed. Face and name associations will become difficult with patients unable to associate certain family member’s faces with their names.

Stage six of Alzheimer’s disease is the beginning of severe cognitive decline. The patient may be unable to remember their spouse’s name. They will be unable to recall large parts of their past. Time will become something they are unable to grasp. Will require more and more assistance with daily activities.

Stage seven is the final stage of the disease. Body control is often loss. The ability to speak is lost as well. Patient may only grunt or make primal noises, often in response to no particular stimulus. Patient will have no set sleep and waking rhythms. Patient will be unable to recognize family members and friends.

 

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